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20121207
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questions about the fiscal cliff on twitter, and with less than a month to go, the white house dispatched treasury secretary tim geithner to five sunday talk shows to declare tax rates on the wealthy are going up one way or another. >> if the republicans say, sorry, no way are we going to raise rates on the wealthy. you guys are willing to go off the fiscal cliff? >> it republicans are not willing to let rates go back up, and we think they should go back to the clinton levels, a the a time when the american economy was doing exceptionally well, then there will not be an agreement. >> while geithner was drawing a line in the sand, house speaker john boehner was busy trying to lift his jaw off the flar after geithner presented the president's debt reduction plans to him last week. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said you can't be serious. i have just never seen anything like it. >> yes, indeed, it seems that republicans are not quite sure what to make of the president taking a harder line across the bargaining table. >> you know, the president's idea of a negotiation is rol
for campaign style events on the fiscal cliff. >> no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. so right now all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it needs leadership. >> speaker boehner said the president needs to get serious about what spending cuts he's willing to make. but that was news to senate majority leader harry reid. >> he says that democrats have got to get serious about cuts, spending cuts. where is the disconnect then? >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him, okay? >> he's not alone. all this comes as treasury secretary tim geithner held separate meetings today with boehner, reid, nancy pelosi, and mitch mcconnell, and over at the white house spokesman jay carney said the debt ceiling should not be a pawn in any kind of fiscal gamesmanship. >> asking for a -- that a political price be paid in order for congress to do its job to ensure that the united states of america pays its bills and does not default for the first time in its history is deeply irresponsible.
at the president and his popular proposal for handling the fiscal cliff. we're joined by nbc's luke russert. luke, help me now because i just want you to answer this question. did anyone in this country vote for the ryan budget on november the 6th? >> reporter: well, people voted for the ryan budget, that side lost though, martin, as you saw. what's interesting is house republicans are saying they want a more serious offer, but the big story here aside from the republicans rejecting the democrats' first offer, is the republicans are really trying to push the 2011 language about the so-called almost agreement between john boehner and president obama. it's that language that had more cuts to entitlements, more language where revenue was capped at $800 billion. they're trying to say let's go back to the 2011 agreement -- >> but there's been a presidential election. >> reporter: and that point has essentially up to right now been lost. they're negotiating from the 2011 position because they think that puts them in the best position to get as much as they can in terms of this debate. >> right. okay. w
, and we're back with more on the high stakes negotiations over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner says he's eager to sit down with the president now that republicans have put forward what he called a middle ground proposal. but that's not quite how white house spokesman jay carney sees the offer. >> we don't know who pays. we don't know what we're talking about in terms of actual legislation to increase revenues. it's magic beans and fairy dust. >> let's get right to our panel now. in philadelphia is professor james peterson. in washington msnbc contributor dr. jared bernstein, senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities and a former economist for vice president joe biden. jared, if i might start with you, speaker boehner says he put forward a middle ground proposal. no tax increases for the healthiest of americahealthy est of americans, yet he wants to rage the eligibility of medicare and he wants to slash billions from every program. if that's a middle ground proposal, i would rather have the paul ryan budget but maybe they're the same thing. >> i was thinking what do
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4